Weave

We are placing our mark on the earth by how we live, what we consume, what we throw away and what can’t go away. Much of the United States national identity
is associated with capitalism and consumerism. We as consumers, express our place in the world through the acquisition of goods for ourselves and our homes. The by-product of these purchases is the plastic bag. According to the EPA, over 380 billion plastic bags are consumed in the U.S. each year. Even with a dedicated effort to recycle, the alarmingly high rate of consumption far surpasses the benefits recycling can offer. They never biodegrade — surviving for centuries on our land and oceans. It breaks up into tiny little pieces that contaminate soil, pollute our oceans and endangers species. The word “artifact” has many meanings... “any object made by human beings; a handmade object characteristic of an earlier time or cultural stage; any mass-produced, usually inexpensive object reflecting contemporary society”. Plastics represent the eternal artifacts of our modern world. Through the process of collecting reclaimed plastic bags and manipulating them through a variety of methods such as heat fusing, sewing and weaving; my work explores the use of plastic as product rather than simply a by-product of our daily habit of consumption. In doing so, I challenge the viewer to question the original intent and necessity of single use disposable plastics while offering alternative solutions to this problem. 

Our Cross

2014

Medium: reclaimed plastic bags
Dimensions: 65" x 35.5"
This work explores the use of plastic as product rather than simply a by-product of our daily habit of consumption. Symbolically this tapestry serves as a reminder that our impact on this earth will be the cross that future generations will inevitably bear.

Stop

2014

Medium: reclaimed plastic bags
Dimensions: 35" x 35" x 4" 
The basic white grocery bag exhibits soft, pliable characteristics that are often overlooked because of its utilitarian, disposable purpose. Through manipulation of the form and context, its tactile qualities are revealed, while symbolically challenging one to question its original intent.

Thunderbird Chair & Stooble

2017

Medium: reclaimed plastic bags, billboard vinyl, wood 
Dimensions, chair: 32" h x 21" w
Dimensions, stooble: 12" h x 11.5" w
The plastic grocery bag is a common side effect of consumerism. It lacks value beyond its limited use. My process involves collecting and reusing reclaimed bags and manipulating their form and context to reveal their tactile qualities rather than reaffirming their intended function. The Petite Thunderbird Chair and Stooble
are designed for children. The design integrates symbology from our ancestral Puebloans - the diamond (representing wisdom) the sky band & the thunderbird (both symbols of happiness). 

Wisdom Chair & Stooble

2017

Medium: reclaimed plastic bags, billboard vinyl, wood 
Dimensions, chair: 44" L x 8" h x 27"
Dimensions, stooble: 15" h x 11.5" w
The Wisdom chair is a symbol of the beaches on which we find so much plastic debris. Through changing the form and context of a basic brown plastic grocery bag, its tactile qualities are revealed, while symbolically challenging one to question its original intent. 

Wisdom Eyes

2017

Medium: Woven reclaimed plastic bags 
Dimensions: 15.5" w x 46" h
This work references traditional Native American weaving methods, yet reinterpreted by using plastic bag debris from the industrialized world. The diamonds appearing on this woven shawl represent the eyes of wisdom. Repeated four times, they symbolize the four directions, north, south, east and west. Which direction we choose to take in life, will ultimately impact our relationship to our place on mother earth.